Natural Hair For The Summer

Natural Hair Tips

July 9, 2018

natual hair“It’s Too Hot For Natural Hair”!

Ladies it is that time of the year. The temperatures are rising to nearly 100 degrees, and it is only spring. Trust me when I say, I know maintaining your curly tresses can be a hassle during the summer. Here are a few tips that can help with this matter.

Deep Conditioning

It is important that you deep condition often. I recommend deep conditioning once a week or every two weeks. Deep conditioning prevents hair breakage and strengthens your strands. It also reduces split ends, and it improves your texture by giving elasticity. When purchasing conditioner, look for products with essential oils such as argan and olive oil. In addition to these great benefits, your hair will receive moisture.

Speaking of Moisture..

Moisturizing is essential to healthy hair, especially since the weather is getting warmer. You can keep your hair hydrated by applying a good moisturizer. Remember water is the best moisturizer. So be sure your hair is wet before applying a leave in conditioner, hair butter, or hair lotion. After applying the product, be sure to seal that moisture by using an oil. Often times people think that oils can be used as a moisturizer, but oils are sealants. So remember to apply your moisturizer first, and then the oil on top.

Get a Good Gel

I know some people aren’t a fan of hair gel, but gel can be your friend during the hot days. Gel helps with frizz. It gives control of your style and gives your hair a hold. Plus, there are some gels out there that can help with humidity.

Protective Styling

If you ever feel like you need a break from styling your hair, try protective styling. You can do protective hairstyles with your natural hair or with weave. With protective styling, you’ll retain hair length, reduce damage, and it helps with growth. Some examples of protective styles are: twists, braids, and updos.

I guarantee you’ll have a smooth hair summer with these tips.

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Hair companies taking advantage?

Is it me, or is maintaining your hair costly these days? Don’t get me wrong, I know nice things cost especially for great quality.

Let’s talk about the natural hair community for a moment. About a few years ago, natural hair became a movement. People started embracing their natural hair, transitioning from relaxed to natural, and wearing natural hairstyles, such as a wash and go.

If you’re not aware, a lot of natural hair companies started making money. Companies, such as Mielle Organics, Mane Choice and Camille Rose. I think it’s great that there are natural hair companies, but are they taking advantage of the natural hair community?

With that being said, a lot of people who have transitioned to natural,  have decided to go back to relaxed hair. Can you blame them? It cost way less to be relaxed versus being natural. An Olive Oil perm kit can be purchased for $5.95 at dollar general, whereas a Camille Rose gel can be purchased for $20.

Just to put it out there, I am natural. I’ve been natural all of my life. I tried a relaxer once when I was a teenager, but that did not work out, so I just dealt with my hair. With that being said, I am not taking sides. If you didn’t know, there are a lot of radical naturals and a lot of radical relaxed people. If you watch a “natural to relax” or “relax to natural” hair video, you will see what I am referring to.

I believe people should do what is best for them. If you want to be natural, then be natural. If you want to be relaxed, then by all means. At the end of the day it’s your money and your life.

 

 

 

Gun Issue or People Issue?

Hearing all about the gun violence that is going on had me thinking. Some people say guns kill people and others say that people kill people. Where do you stand with this matter?

Just to be clear, I do not carry. I’m not against guns, I just prefer not to have one. With all of the murders that are going on in the world, I think it’s a gun and people issue. A gun can’t aim itself and shoot. Plus there are some sick and evil people in the world.

If someone has the intent to kill, they’re going to find a way to do it. Whether it’s a gun, knife, hammer, etc., they will find a way. Now let me be clear again, I believe that people have the right to bear arms simply for protection, but I believe that there should be some restrictions on who can bear arms.

Now I know that there are ways to get weapons, but maybe the law should make it a little tougher. For one, the age limit. I know in some states you can be 18 and buy a weapon. A 18 year old isn’t quite mature yet in my opinion. Secondly, I think mental evaluations should be administered to whoever is interested in bearing arms. Third, if there are children in the household, all weapons must be put away in some type of lock box. Matter of fact that should be a requirement. There are too many young people who have easy access to their parent’s weapon.

Prime example, a nine year shot his sister in the back of her head over a game. Read it. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/03/19/mississippi-boy-9-fatally-shoots-teen-sister-in-head-over-video-game-controller-police-say.html

For this last one I’m iffy about it. The Open Carry Law. One pro is that someone would have easy access to their weapon in a dangerous situation. One con is that some people would abuse and take advantage of the law. Plus there has been an increase in crime violence. https://www.npr.org/2017/11/07/562619774/does-increased-gun-ownership-help-decrease-crime

So again I ask you, is it a gun issue or a people issue?

Black History Fact of the Day

It’s the last day of Black History Month, but I encourage you to continue educating yourself on black history. Today I would like to turn your attention to the first African American broadcaster.

Jack Leroy Cooper was born on September 18, 1888 in Memphis, Tennessee. He grew up poor in a single family home. He had to quit school at the age of 10 to work. He moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to work at a racetrack.

He worked at different jobs as a teen, and he was a successful boxer. He started his radio career in the 1920s as a comedian at WSBC in Chicago. Due to the lack of representation of African Americans in the industry, he left. He returned in 1929 and became the host and producer of the The All-Negro Hour.

Jack_L_Cooper_0

He also wrote for black newspapers in Memphis and Indianapolis. He became the assistant theater editor at the Chicago Defender. He was hired at WCAP in Washington to assist with writing and performing skits in 1925.

He created Searching for Missing Persons in 1938. The show focused on uniting listeners with their loved ones after losing contact. He started Listen Chicago, which focused on current events in 1940. He also popularized playing records on the radio.

Cooper built his own radio studio and created an advertising agency. He paved the way for black personalities.

Cooper died on January 12, 1970.

For more information visit: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/cooper-jack-leroy-1888-1970

http://www.radiohof.org/jack_cooper.htm

 

Black History Fact of the Day

Ever heard of Daniel “Chappie” James? James was born on February 11, 1920 in Pensacola, Florida. In 1937, he graduated from Pensacola’s Washington High School and enrolled in Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

He graduated in 1942, earning his B.S degree in physical education. The following year, James earned his commission as a Second Lieutenant and became one of the first black pilots of the U.S Air Corps.

James had assignments in the Philippines, Korea and Vietnam. In 1975, James moved up to flag officer and was then promoted to the rank of four star general. He was known as the “Black Eagle” because of his ethics, hard work, and self determination.

James_DanielChappie

In 1967 after receiving the George Washington Freedom Medal, James wrote an essay on what he stood for. “Today’s world situation requires strong men to stand up and be counted – no matter what their personal grievances are. Our greatest weapon is one we have always possessed – our heritage of freedom, our unity as a nation”, said James.

In 1970, James was promoted Brigadier General and became the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense. He served until his retirement in 1978.

On February 25, 1978, James died of a heart attack.

For more information visit: http://www.nationalaviation.org/our-enshrinees/james-jr-daniel/

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/james-general-daniel-chappie-jr-1920-1978

 

Black History Fact of the Day

We often hear the story of Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat to a white passenger, but there was someone else who did the same thing months before Parks did.

Claudette Colvin was born in Montgomery, AL on September 5, 1939. She grew up in a poor neighborhood. She was an A student who studied very hard. She studied black leaders such as Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth.

On March 2, 1955, Colvin refused to give up her seat to a white passenger. “It’s my constitutional right to sit here as much as that lady. I paid my fare, it’s my constitutional right”, said Colvin.

claudette-2

After being charged and spending several hours in jail, her minister bailed her out. The NAACP considered taking on her case, but they refused it because of her age(15). Plus she became pregnant out of wedlock and they thought that could bring negative attention.

During her case she declared herself not guilty, but the court ruled against her and she was placed on probation. She gained a reputation as a troublemaker, dropped out of school, and it was difficult for her to find a job.

She became one of the four women that were plaintiffs in the Browder v. Gayle case. The decision in the case ruled that the Montgomery’s segregated bus system was unconstitutional.

In 1958, Colvin moved to New York where she found work as a nurse’s aid at a nursing home. She retired in 2004.

For more information visit http://www.pbs.org/black-culture/explore/10-black-history-little-known-facts/#.WpGMga6nHcc

https://www.biography.com/people/claudette-colvin-11378

Black History Fact of the day

John Russwurm was born on October 1, 1799 in Jamaica. He was the son of a white American merchant and an unknown black Jamaican woman. He was sent to Canada by his father to receive an education.

Russwurm became the second African American to earn a degree in the United States in 1826. He moved to New York the following year, and partnered with Samuel Cornish and together they published the first issue of Freedom’s Journal.

russwurm_john

He obtained control of the Freedom’s Journal paper until 1829. Russwurm decided to move to Liberia due to his frustration over the impossibility of ending slavery. He was the first nonwhite to become governor in Liberia Colony, West Africa.

Russwurm learned African languages and participated in politics. He died in Liberia in 1851.

For more information visit: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/russwurm-john-1799-1851